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by in Coded Smorgasbord on

Michael W came into the office to a hair-on-fire freakout: the midnight jobs failed. The entire company ran on batch processes to integrate data across a dozen ERPs, mainframes, CRMs, PDQs, OMGWTFBBQs, etc.: each business unit ran its own choice of enterprise software, but then needed to share data. If they couldn’t share data, business ground to a halt.

Business had ground to a halt, and it was because the archiver job had failed to copy some files. Michael owned the archiver program, not by choice, but because he got the short end of that particular stick.


Alien Code Reuse

by in Feature Articles on

“Probably the best thing to do is try and reorganize the project some,” Tim, “Alien”’s new boss said. “It’s a bit of a mess, so a little refactoring will help you understand how the code all fits together.”

“Alien” grabbed the code from git, and started walking through the code. As promised, it was a bit of a mess, but partially that mess came from their business needs. There was a bunch of common functionality in a Common module, but for each region they did business in- Asia, North America, Europe, etc.- there was a region specific deployable, each in its own module. Each region had its own build target that would include the Common module as part of the build process.


Alphabetical Soup

by in Error'd on

"I appreciate that TIAA doesn't want to fully recognize that the country once known as Burma now calls itself Myanmar, but I don't think that this is the way to handle it," Bruce R. writes.


The Least of the Max

by in CodeSOD on

Adding assertions and sanity checks to your code is important, especially when you’re working in a loosely-typed language like JavaScript. Never assume the input parameters are correct, assert what they must be. Done correctly, they not only make your code safer, but also easier to understand.

Matthias’s co-worker… doesn’t exactly do that.


In $BANK We Trust

by in Feature Articles on

During the few months after getting my BS and before starting my MS, I worked for a bank that held lots of securities - and gold - in trust for others. There was a massive vault with multiple layers of steel doors, iron door grates, security access cards, armed guards, and signature comparisons (live vs pre-registered). It was a bit unnerving to get in there, so deep below ground, but once in, it looked very much like the Fort Knox vault scene in Goldfinger.

Someone planning things on a whiteboard

At that point, PCs weren't yet available to the masses and I had very little exposure to mainframes. I had been hired as an assistant to one of their drones who had been assigned to find all of the paper-driven-changes that had gone awry and get their books up to date.


Why Medical Insurance Is So Expensive

by in Feature Articles on

VA One AE Preliminary Project Timeline 2001-02

At the end of 2016, Ian S. accepted a contract position at a large medical conglomerate. He was joining a team of 6 developers on a project to automate what was normally a 10,000-hour manual process of cross-checking spreadsheets and data files. The end result would be a Django server offering a RESTful API and MySQL backend.


Tern Back

by in Representative Line on

In the process of resolving a ticket, Pedro C found this representative line, which has nothing to do with the bug he was fixing, but was just something he couldn’t leave un-fixed:

$categories = (isset($categoryMap[$product['department']]) ?
                            (isset($categoryMap[$product['department']][$product['classification']])
                                        ?
                                    $categoryMap[$product['department']][$product['classification']]
                                        : NULL) : NULL);

Hamilton, Hamilton, Hamilton, Hamilton

by in Error'd on

"Good news! I can get my order shipped anywhere I want...So long as the city is named Hamilton," Daniel wrote.


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